pbsdigitalstudios:

Is Photoshop Remixing The World? Watch this episode of Off Book to see what experts think: http://youtu.be/egnB3teYiPQ
Photoshop has COMPLETELY revolutionized our visual culture. Artists now use Photoshop to create complex imagery that would have been impossible 20 years ago. It has also profoundly changed the art of photo retouching, turning a labor intensive process into an artful and often controversial digital workflow. But possibly the most current and expressive influence can be seen in meme culture online. With the ability to alter any image in the media landscape, everyday people now have the means to critically comment on culture and spread their ideas virally, leveling the playing field between traditional media creators and consumers. Photoshop has changed the way we communicate, the way we express ourselves, and the way we view the world and each other.

pbsdigitalstudios:

Is Photoshop Remixing The World? Watch this episode of Off Book to see what experts think: http://youtu.be/egnB3teYiPQ

Photoshop has COMPLETELY revolutionized our visual culture. Artists now use Photoshop to create complex imagery that would have been impossible 20 years ago. It has also profoundly changed the art of photo retouching, turning a labor intensive process into an artful and often controversial digital workflow. But possibly the most current and expressive influence can be seen in meme culture online. With the ability to alter any image in the media landscape, everyday people now have the means to critically comment on culture and spread their ideas virally, leveling the playing field between traditional media creators and consumers. Photoshop has changed the way we communicate, the way we express ourselves, and the way we view the world and each other.

50 notes

Do you wireframe?

Wireframes allow designers to start the dialog that we need to refine our projects and gain more understanding on how the initial design is perceived. Although I’ve seen designers, myself included, jump right into graphic UI prototypes or even right into coding and completely skipping the wireframing exercise, I can’t say that it isn’t necessary to wireframe.  Even if we are completely sure that we are working with the right assumptions, wireframe can be useful. In fact, from experience I can say is that it depends on what is being designed, how complex it is, and whether or not our requirements and assumptions are well conceived. I would rather have tons of wireframe versions with different states and get the feedback I need for that in a collaborative manner before I spend time with my visual UI work or the interactive programming, but I find working on wireframe deliverables kind of a luxury in my every day work. The whiteboard is still my best friend with coming up with ideas on my own, but for collaboration, it is not the best tool when my collaborators are not together in the same room discussing the design. So, wireframes have a very specific purpose when designers integrate them in their workflow arsenal, they can be powerful design communication deliverables early on in the process.    

I’m including a great presentation from Russ Unger about the use of wireframes here so you can make yourself comfortable with how much you use them or not. It’s all about the collaborative and iterative process that every design must go through. It is as simple as that. Happy Designing!  

0 notes

“Good design is invisible.”

cameronmoll:

Oliver Reichenstein, in an interview with The Verge:

Good screen design happens in the subatomic level of microtypography (the exact definition of a typeface), the invisible grid of macrotypography (how the typeface is used), and the invisible world of interaction design and information architecture. Minimum input, maximum output, with minimal conscious thought is what screen designers focus on.

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jesseddy:

This is kind of stunning, check it out: https://moqups.com/

jesseddy:

This is kind of stunning, check it out: https://moqups.com/

2 notes

"It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge"

Albert Einstein

0 notes